Superintendent Matsuoka Presents Annual School Status Update

Matsuoka Talks Big Picture, Nuts and Bolts in Yearly Address

“Public education is more important than ever. Our political divide in this country is sharp, and it feels like it’s growing wider, not back together. We need to teach our students ​— ​and frankly, our adults ​— ​how to have civil, intelligent discourse about the issues we face as a culture. And we also need to reinvent public education to prepare students for the world of today and the future, not the world of the past. That’s a real challenge for us … because we’re not well funded [and] we have a lot of cultural memories of what it means to be educators. We’re working hard to change our models.”

Paul Wellman

“Public education is more important than ever. Our political divide in this country is sharp, and it feels like it’s growing wider, not back together. We need to teach our students ​— ​and frankly, our adults ​— ​how to have civil, intelligent discourse about the issues we face as a culture. And we also need to reinvent public education to prepare students for the world of today and the future, not the world of the past. That’s a real challenge for us … because we’re not well funded [and] we have a lot of cultural memories of what it means to be educators. We’re working hard to change our models.”

On the ground, the job is tough enough. How can Santa Barbara Unified School District continue to provide safe campuses, functional electrical and plumbing, and modernized classrooms designed to grow kids’ curiosity and critical thinking? And once inside those young brains, what sorts of intellectual and technological tools can best help teachers and administrators stay on point in a rapidly changing world, where the classes of 2018 and 2030, for example, will likely step foot into vastly different realities in terms of higher education and the job market?

“I think we have to prepare our students ​— ​especially the younger ones ​— ​for a life of redesign,” Superintendent Cary Matsuoka (pictured right) told a crowd last week during his State of Our Schools presentation, hosted by the Santa Barbara Education Foundation. “If we try to prepare kids for a career today, that career may be disrupted and gone in 2030. What we need to teach is creativity, how to redesign your life [and] skill set and learn new things.”

In that respect, Matsuoka’s talk touched on Common Core standards, the district’s 7,400 new iPads, and the foundational importance of literacy. He also touched on the nuts and bolts of facilities spending, budgetary overviews, and the recent change in the district’s funding model. The following images are captioned with direct quotes from Matsuoka’s talk.

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